Tilghman senior sets sights on med school
Years after Loyd first told his parents he wanted to be a doctor, his determination to follow through on that declaration has yet to waiver. He’s still weighing his undergraduate education options— University of Kentucky, University of Louisville, Centre College and Washington University are all in the mix — but there is no question that medical school will come after his college of choice.

Were Loyd’s heart not set on being a doctor, he might have a promising future as a businessman. Since 2008, he has been running his own little neighborhood lawn care operation. He began his work when he realized several of his family’s older neighbors had a difficult time taking care of their yards. He offered to help. He’s only ever had four or five lawns at a time, but it’s kept him busy, he said. Over the years his neighbors have come to trust him and rely on him for other things too, like helping them run errands or with other chores around the house. “And it’s definitely taught me the value of a dollar,” Lloyd said. “Especially when I’m out there working and it’s 95 degrees in the summer. You really learn to appreciate how much even $40 is worth when you have to work hard for it.”

Loyd also helps out his mother at her consignment shop, Cotton Tails. He helps her organize and move merchandise, help with data entry and pricing, as well as social media marketing for the business. “It started out as a way to help out my mother, but led me to become aware of how much effort goes into running a small business,” Loyd said. “It also helped me to understand what my mother deals with on a daily basis, giving me an enhanced respect for her.” Loyd, an AP Scholar and fourth in his class at Tilghman, has kept just as busy in school as he has after school. In his four years at Tilghman he’s had his hands in Student Council, Spanish Club, Beta Club, Mock Trial Team, National Honor Society and Future Business Leaders of America. But the activity he says has shaped him the most has been Academic Team.

“I’ve done it all four years of high school, and I’ve loved it, because you always learn something,” Loyd said. The questions he and his teammates face in competitions range from chemistry to current events. Any topic is fair game, so they have to be on top of theirs. “It’s helped me realize that learning is one of the most important things we do, and that we should continue to do so for the rest of our lives,” Loyd said.

(Photo credit: Lily Shapiro, The Tilghman Bell)
Print This Article